thisoldapt
thisoldapt:

Just like you don’t HAVE to use magnetic spice racks in the kitchen, you don’t HAVE to use shower caddies in the bathroom! Could be the perfect organizational upgrade for a small home office wall or craft room. Install a whole row of them if that’s what you need! Go nuts. While you’re at it, put a plastic shoe organizer on a pantry or linen- closet door and don’t use it for shoes! -ts

Great for hair products and styling tools, in a bathroom closet, too.
diyhoard:

 Shower Caddy Storage
Who knew metal shower caddies could make cute storage for your room? Spruce it up with bows, ribbons, and even washi tape.

thisoldapt:

Just like you don’t HAVE to use magnetic spice racks in the kitchen, you don’t HAVE to use shower caddies in the bathroom! Could be the perfect organizational upgrade for a small home office wall or craft room. Install a whole row of them if that’s what you need! Go nuts. While you’re at it, put a plastic shoe organizer on a pantry or linen- closet door and don’t use it for shoes! -ts

Great for hair products and styling tools, in a bathroom closet, too.

diyhoard:

Shower Caddy Storage

Who knew metal shower caddies could make cute storage for your room? Spruce it up with bows, ribbons, and even washi tape.

frogmanslightschool

nothingbutbonesinabodybag asked:

I take head shots at my high school's theatre department and I'm curious on how I could get a professional look without a light setup? I have a Nikon d3100 with the stock lens.

frogmanslightschool answered:

Kaitlin here:

Natural light is a great way to get really professional looking light without using a lighting set up. While lights are nice to have, they’re expensive and not always convenient. Nearly every portrait I’ve ever shot on my own (meaning, not doing something in a client’s set up) I’ve shot only using natural light.

Now, that’s not to say that natural light can’t be tricky, or that there aren’t ways to harness it. There are! Your best friend will be a reflector. You can buy these for not too much money, and they come in many varieties, including silver, gold, and a matte white. Silver will throw off bright, cooler light. Gold will throw off bright, warmer light, and the matte white will give a diffused, gentler light.

(If you don’t want to buy a reflector, you can make one. Foam board and tinfoil and tape. Do one side with the shiny side out, one side with the matte side out. This is actually taught by real professors in NYU’s film department so you know it’s legit. And cheap. Mostly cheap. It does really work, though.)

So, head outside with your reflective device. Angle the reflector so you get a nice fill on the subject; under the eyes is going to be your main point of focus. You want to make sure the brows don’t cast a shadow over their eyes, especially for acting head shots.

Another solution are light rings and light boxes. They come in varying degrees of quality and price, and there are a lot of great resources online for how to make your own. That being said, I would still pick a reflector. It’s easiest to set up, doesn’t run out of power, and throws off really beautiful light.

Along with that, you’ll want to do shallow depth of field and not position your subject right up against a drab wall. Finding a location that’s not distracting but doesn’t scream school picture day will go really far to elevating the professionalism of your portraits.

Hope that helps!

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Cool!

frogmanslightschool
frogmanslightschool:

Exposure 201



Exposure occurs when the camera’s sensor is revealed and responds to a volume of light for a period of time. The goal of a controlled or “correct” exposure is to make a photograph that is neither too bright nor too dark. To do that, we must bring into balance 4 variables:
A given level of light
The sensitivity of the recording surface in the camera (ISO)
Lens aperture (regulates how much light enters the camera)
Shutter speed (regulates how long the sensor is exposed to light)
Because these 4 variables are inextricably linked, a change in any one requires a counterbalancing change in another. For instance, if the quantity of light in a scene suddenly increases (perhaps the sun comes out from behind a cloud), the photographer will adjust either the lens aperture to cut back on the amount of light entering the camera, the shutter speed to reduce the length of time the sensor is exposed to light, or the ISO, to reduce the sensitivity of the sensor. We call this balancing act reciprocity. In order to make this process simpler, photographers try to “lock down” on one or more of these variables, depending on a particular image’s requirements. The easiest variables to commit to generally are the level of light in a scene and the ISO setting on the camera, leaving only the aperture and shutter speed to bring into balance.



In the hypothetical situation illustrated on the chart above, the camera’s meter has determined that 1/30 second at f8 at ISO 100 was the correct exposure for a particular level of light. But as you can see, for this level of light at ISO 100 there are any number of other shutter and aperture combinations that will also result in a “correct” exposure. While different combinations will result in the same image brightness, they will offer a variety of visual effects. For instance, choosing a combination toward the left side of the chart balances a faster shutter speed with a larger aperture, allowing you to stop motion, but also resulting in shallow depth-of-field. The combinations toward the right balance slower shutter speeds with smaller apertures, causing anything moving in the image to record as a blur while resulting in greater depth-of-field. These are scientific truths based on absolute laws of physics, and until the age of digital imaging were undeniable. Luckily for you, in this pre-Photoshop module, they still are. 
To make shooting a little easier, digital SLR’s offer a variety of methods of automating some or all of the exposure process called Exposure Modes. Shutter Priority Mode allows you to manually select the shutter speed, which makes the camera automatically set the corresponding aperture. Aperture Priority Mode is used when you want to control the aperture yourself, and the camera then chooses the matching shutter speed. Program Mode chooses both the shutter and aperture at the same time by allowing you to quickly scroll through all of the combinations that result in a “correct” exposure. Manual Mode requires you to set both shutter and aperture yourself, “nulling the meter” by referring to a scale displayed in the viewfinder. Each of these exposure modes are responding to the exact same lighting conditions, but they offer the photographer different interactivity with the camera. Each can be overridden when necessary using the exposure compensation control for the automatic modes, and simply adding or subtracting exposure in manual mode. 
(big thanks to Shawn Read on this tutorial)
Post by Bex
Find me here: [Tumblr | Facebook | Society 6 | 500px]

frogmanslightschool:

Exposure 201

Exposure occurs when the camera’s sensor is revealed and responds to a volume of light for a period of time. The goal of a controlled or “correct” exposure is to make a photograph that is neither too bright nor too dark. To do that, we must bring into balance 4 variables:

  • A given level of light
  • The sensitivity of the recording surface in the camera (ISO)
  • Lens aperture (regulates how much light enters the camera)
  • Shutter speed (regulates how long the sensor is exposed to light)

Because these 4 variables are inextricably linked, a change in any one requires a counterbalancing change in another. For instance, if the quantity of light in a scene suddenly increases (perhaps the sun comes out from behind a cloud), the photographer will adjust either the lens aperture to cut back on the amount of light entering the camera, the shutter speed to reduce the length of time the sensor is exposed to light, or the ISO, to reduce the sensitivity of the sensor. We call this balancing act reciprocity. In order to make this process simpler, photographers try to “lock down” on one or more of these variables, depending on a particular image’s requirements. The easiest variables to commit to generally are the level of light in a scene and the ISO setting on the camera, leaving only the aperture and shutter speed to bring into balance.

In the hypothetical situation illustrated on the chart above, the camera’s meter has determined that 1/30 second at f8 at ISO 100 was the correct exposure for a particular level of light. But as you can see, for this level of light at ISO 100 there are any number of other shutter and aperture combinations that will also result in a “correct” exposure. While different combinations will result in the same image brightness, they will offer a variety of visual effects. For instance, choosing a combination toward the left side of the chart balances a faster shutter speed with a larger aperture, allowing you to stop motion, but also resulting in shallow depth-of-field. The combinations toward the right balance slower shutter speeds with smaller apertures, causing anything moving in the image to record as a blur while resulting in greater depth-of-field. These are scientific truths based on absolute laws of physics, and until the age of digital imaging were undeniable. Luckily for you, in this pre-Photoshop module, they still are.

To make shooting a little easier, digital SLR’s offer a variety of methods of automating some or all of the exposure process called Exposure Modes. Shutter Priority Mode allows you to manually select the shutter speed, which makes the camera automatically set the corresponding aperture. Aperture Priority Mode is used when you want to control the aperture yourself, and the camera then chooses the matching shutter speed. Program Mode chooses both the shutter and aperture at the same time by allowing you to quickly scroll through all of the combinations that result in a “correct” exposure. Manual Mode requires you to set both shutter and aperture yourself, “nulling the meter” by referring to a scale displayed in the viewfinder. Each of these exposure modes are responding to the exact same lighting conditions, but they offer the photographer different interactivity with the camera. Each can be overridden when necessary using the exposure compensation control for the automatic modes, and simply adding or subtracting exposure in manual mode. 

(big thanks to Shawn Read on this tutorial)

Post by Bex

Find me here: [Tumblr | Facebook | Society 6 | 500px]